Tag Archives | translation

The Complete Spanish to English Fish Translation Guide

After watching the Forks Over Knives documentary this summer – and buying their cookbook – I quickly realized that I could not commit to a full vegan lifestyle change. However, I decided to drastically reduce the amount of meat in my diet, especially red meat.

While we were in the US we had a ton of options to replace meat including some very good vegan products and also a lot of seafood choices. Now, back in Buenos Aires (the land of red meat), most of those options do not exist. Luckily, after some searching, we have been finding quite a few good seafood markets. The Disco Supermarket on Cuba in Belgrano has a great seafood section, and is probably the nicest supermarket I’ve been too in Buenos Aires so far.

Knowing what fish is what is a big step in finding the best choices. So, without further ado, I present to you the Spanish to English fish translation guide for Argentina. Please leave a comment and let me know of any that I may have missed.

SpanishEnglish
AbadejoKingclip
AlmejaClam
AnchoaAnchory / Bluefish
AnchoitaAnchovy
AtnTuna
BacalaoCodfish
BesugoRed Snapper
BonitoBonito
BrotolaForkbeard
CabalaMackerel
CalamarCalamari / Squid
CalamareteSmall Squid
CamaronCommon Prawn
CangrejoCrab
Casta￱etaPomfret
Caz￳nShark
CentollaKing Crab
CigalaCrayfish
CongrioConger Eel
CorvinaCroaker
CherniaSea Bass
DoradoMahi Mahi
LachaAtlantic Herring
LangostaLobster
LangostinoShrimp / Crawfish
LenguadoFlounder / Fluke
LisaMullet
MeroGrouper
MejillonMussel
MerluzaHake / Whiting
Merluza NegraToothfish
PalometaBream
PargoSea Bream
PejerreyPejerrey
PescadillaSea Trout
Pez AngelAngelfish
Pez espadaSwordfish
Pez LimonYellowtail
Pez PaloFlathead
PulpoOctopus / Cuttlefish
RayaRay
RobaloBass
SalmonSalmon
SalmoneteMullet
TrillaMullet
VieyraScallop

Hope this helps you out too.

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Expat Tech: Google Translate – Now Supports PDF and Office Docs

Google TranslateGoogle Translate has been an  indispensable tool in my move to Buenos Aires and I’ve written about the many benefits of using it already. I’ve used it to translate local Spanish language web sites, decipher emails from new Argentine friends, help with my Spanish homework, etc.

Google has just added a new feature: the ability to translate PDF files and Office documents from one language to another. It does this by converting the document to HTML on the fly, and then displaying the translated HTML file back to you.  The cool thing?  It can do this even if the document is not indexed in Google.  So, how do you do this for a document on your computer or in your email that you want translated?  Glad you asked…

First, you need to put your document up on the web somewhere.  I use my favorite file sharing site, Drop.io, to create a new “drop” and upload the document. Drop.io lets you create shared web folders with up to 100MB of storage for free. You can pick the name, set a password and access permissions, etc. For this to work, make sure that your drop is public.

Once the drop is created and the file is uploaded on drop.io, click on “Full Page View” under the document. This opens a new window with the document displayed. Right-click on the “Download” link in the upper left, and select “Copy Shortcut” to save a copy of the link to that file.  You now have a URL for your file that you can give to Google to translate.

Next, head over to Google Translate. Click on “Text and Web” at the top and paste the link from drop.io. Make sure the language settings are correct and then click “Translate.”  That’s it!  You’ll now have a translation of your document available for viewing.

It works fairly well, but it seems to be limited to smaller documents right now.  I tried to translate a 47 page document and received an error: “The page you requested was too large to be translated.” The limit seems to depend on the file size and number of pages of text.

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